Harris, Shelton, Hanover, Walsh, P.L.L.C.

Phone: 615.377.2526
414 Union Street
Suite 1007
Nashville, TN 37219
East Memphis
6060 Primacy Parkway, Suite 100
Memphis, TN 38119
Downtown Memphis - One Commerce Square
40 S. Main Street, Suite 2210
Memphis, TN 38103
Go To Firm Site
414 Union Street
Suite 1007
Nashville TN
Phone: 615.377.2526
Cell: 901.461.0807
Email: runderwood@harrisshelton.com
East Memphis
6060 Primacy Parkway, Suite 100
Memphis TN
Phone: 901.305.8312
Cell: 901.461.0807
Email: pwalker@harrisshelton.com

Firm Information


At Harris Shelton Hanover Walsh, PLLC, we believe successful results are achieved by building true partnerships with our clients. We do this by understanding their industries and the economic climates in which they operate. Then, we tackle the legal issues that impact their businesses and their livelihoods. We have deep roots in Memphis, with offices in Nashville and Covington. We partner with businesses and individuals to navigate the myriad challenges of transacting business and competing in a global economy. Our work reflects our clients’ values and their overall philosophy.

At Harris Shelton Hanover Walsh, PLLC, our lawyers practice in a variety of areas ranging from health care matters and litigation to the full spectrum of business counseling and litigation, including real estate and commercial lending and leasing, eminent domain and governmental taking, taxation, bankruptcy and work-outs, planned giving and sophisticated estate planning, labor and employment counseling and litigation, intellectual property counseling and litigation, and specialized appellate advocacy.

Harris Shelton was founded by Walter C. Chandler, a philanthropist, civic leader, and longtime public servant who represented Memphis in both the Tennessee and U.S. House of Representatives (authoring the first bankruptcy wage-earner law) as well as for multiple mayoral terms. Mr. Chandler’s most prominent accomplishment in private practice was his representation of the plaintiffs in the landmark U. S. Supreme Court decision in Baker v. Carr, known to all students of constitutional law as the ruling that opened the courthouse to individuals seeking equal representation.